5/28 @ 10 AM Coffee Break & Culture Featuring Shilo Ratner

IMAGE CREDIT: JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER OF GREATER NEW HAVEN

JOIN ME NEXT THURSDAY!

Click to Register. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

We may not have access to our newly opened Hoos Family Art Gallery, but that won’t stop us from connecting together over culture in our own backyard! Pour your cup of coffee and connect with local artists from the comfort of your own home. Send your questions in advance or ask live during the 30 minute sessions. Register in advance and we’ll see you soon

Artist Information: Artist Description: Shilo Ratner is an artist and educator whose work is interpreted as geometric abstract landscape paintings. Her work explores architectural and natural landscapes using a hyper-realistic execution of stillness, through a tight complex network of lines and forms. Ratner’s award-winning paintings have been exhibited in galleries and museums in the United States and Tel Aviv, including the Museum of Contemporary Art, Bryant Street Gallery in Palo Alto, CA as well as Art Fairs such as Fresh Paint Tel Aviv, Israel. Her work is part of dozens of collections nationally and abroad.

The Shape of Things

The Shape of Things
Shilo Ratner 2020 DaSilva Gallery Exhibition

Written and photographed by Kathy Leonard Czepiel.

Special thank you goes out to the wrier Kathy Leonard Czepiel for this wonderful article in the Daily Nutmeg. Original article can be found http://dailynutmeg.com/2020/01/30/paintings-shilo-ratner-dasilva-gallery-shape-things/

I n painting after painting in Shilo Ratner’s soon-ending solo exhibition at DaSilva Gallery, big blocks of color meet contrasting angles and lines and bands. Together, they suggest a grand experiment in which the artist seems to be working out a pattern, using shapes and colors to reach a deeper sense of order.

There’s repetition in the obtuse angles, knife-edged lines and flat fields. But each time, the treatment is a little bit different, like multiple attempts at a tangram puzzle in which you try first one solution, then another. Does the large block belong at the top of the canvas, compressing the thinner lines below? Does it belong at the bottom, with an accumulation of thinner lines above? Or should it, perhaps, float in the center or even higher?

In Looking Up at the Open Sky, a “horizon” line tips ever so slightly, to vertiginous effect. Other lines compensate by tipping in the opposite direction, but it’s hard to find the level. With a large, pale blue block of color dominating the top of the canvas, the experience of looking up at the sky and losing touch with the ground is uncannily recreated.

Shifting Waters shifts the experiment with a dominating dark wall that slices diagonally through the canvas in shades of brown and green striped with red. Like the horizon in Open Sky, this partition is unsettling; each of its bands of color locates the wall’s corner in a different place. A segmented gray shape follows it like a sidewalk. In the background, cheerful blues peek through.

Only two of the show’s 16 paintings break the pattern to include a portion of a circle, partially obscured by horizontal lines, which calls to mind a rising or setting sun. Seeing these pieces last might make the circles an element of surprise, but one is displayed in the front window and the other just inside the door. Their placement seems to instruct us to think of the more squared geometric images that follow as doing the same: overlapping and obscuring one another, just as the circle is obscured by the lines that hide its completion.

Sure enough, on closer examination, Ratner’s paintings are more layered and subtle than they first appear. Return for a second look and then a third; even more layers emerge. It’s as if the closer you step to these works, the farther in they draw you. For example, once you notice them, subtle banded and triangular ghosts behind an ivory block of color in Temple of the Moon give the unexpected effect of sunlight casting a quiet shadow.

Ratner sees her artwork as a form of meditation. Her painting process begins each day with Japa meditation, which uses sound repetition in the form of mantras that put her in a positive frame of mind to approach the canvas intuitively. “I just start with a shape,” she says. She draws on her formal art education—a knowledge of color and brush technique, for example—but mostly, she says, the paintings “sort of just evolve on their own. They have their own voice, and I try to just bring it out on the canvas.”

The colors she chooses—tiger orange, sapphire blue, sunny yellow—excite the eye, and yet the way her shapes hug tight and her lines stretch straight conveys a sense of stability. Even when she’s tipping us off balance, the tilt feels more playful than precarious.

The net positive effect is intentional, Ratner says. She names some of the things that are tilting our global society today—climate change, anti-Semitism, Islamophobia. “I try to bring beauty into the world,” she says. “[I’m] not saying that I’m not aware of everything that’s happening, but I’m trying to put something out there that doesn’t have that angst, so I when I’m creating the work, I want to create these calm visions, kind of this optimistic view of the world I see in the chaotic times we’re living in.”

DaSilva Gallery

DaSilva Gallery
New Year, New Work, New Decade!
First Solo Show of the New Decade! Join me this Saturday for my first solo show of 2020. It’s also my first ever New Haven, CT solo show. DaSilva Gallery: 899 Whalley Ave, New Haven, CT 06515
Reception 1/11/20, 5-7pm
See What’s New on Instagram
Artist Shilo Ratner, Shifting Waters
Artist Shilo Ratner, Shifting Waters, 48 inches x 48 inches

Yale West Campus – Nov 2 & 3

Yale West Campus – Nov 2 & 3

Left to Right: "Evening Stroll" and "Stillness"
Artist Shilo Ratner:  “Evening Stroll” and “Stillness” (Left to Right)

Getting ready to exhibit my work in two weeks at Yale West Campus on November 2 & 3.  Come by and say hi.

Yale West Campus hosts a record-breaking 230+ artists, collectives, art departments and more, plus nine special commissions. Pick up a schedule at the entrance to Building 410 to find locations for each artist, plus information about special events.

Noon – 5:00 PM

November 2 & 3

Building 410
100 West Campus Dr
Orange, CT

Solo Exhibition: Lawn Club

Below the Surface, 20 x 20in, Acrylic
Below the Surface, 20 x 20in, Acrylic

2019 is turning out to be an incredible year! Another solo exhibition has been put on the books.

Lawn Club, New Haven, CT
Exhibition: November 1 – December 21, 2019
Artist Reception: Tuesday November 5 (5-7pm)